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Yorkshire Terrier Puppies

Product Description

   

BREED: Yorkshire Terrier
GENDER: Female I Male
PUREBRED / HYBRID: Purebred – AKC
ESTIMATED ADULT SIZE:  6-7 lbs
DESCRIPTION:  (4) Black & Tan
STORE LOCATION: Just Pets Lone Tree –

8874 Maximus Dr. Lone Tree, CO 80124

Just Pets Centennial –

2154 E Commons Ave #327 Centennial, CO 80122

PHONE NUMBER:  (303) 662-8900 I (303) 220-1500
ITEM #:
PRICE: Call for more info

  The Yorkshire Terrier is a small dog breed of terrier type, developed during the 19th century in Yorkshire, England, to catch rats in clothing mills.[3] The defining feature of the breed is its maximum size of 7 pounds (3.2 kg),[4]although some may exceed this and grow up to 15 pounds (6.8 kg). It is placed in the Toy Terrier section of the Terrier Group by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale and in the Toy Group or Companion Group by other kennel clubs, including the American Kennel Club. A popular companion dog, the Yorkshire Terrier has also been part of the development of other breeds, such as the Australian Silky Terrier. It has a grey, black, and tan coat, and the breed’s nickname is Yorkie.

Coat

For adult Yorkshire Terriers, importance is placed on coat colour, quality, and texture.[18] The hair must be glossy, fine, straight, and silky. Traditionally the coat is grown out very long and is parted down the middle of the back, but “must never impede movement.”[19]

From the back of the neck to the base of the tail, the coat should be a dark gray to a black colour, and the hair on the tail should be a darker black. On the head, high chest, and legs, the hair should be a bright, rich tan, darker at the roots than in the middle, that shades into a lighter tan at the tips, but not for all dogs. Also, in adult dogs there should be no black hairs intermingled with any of the tan coloured fur.

Adult Yorkshire Terriers that have other coat colours than the above, or that have woolly or extra fine coats, are still Yorkshire Terriers. The only difference is that atypical Yorkshire Terriers should not intentionally be bred.[20] In addition, care may be more difficult for “woolly” or “cottony” textured coats, or coats that are overly fine.[18] One of the reasons given for not breeding “off-coloured” Yorkies is that the colour could be a potential indicator of a genetic defect that may affect the dog’s health, a careful health screening can clarify if any health risks exist.[21] Coats may vary in colour. For example, a grown Yorkie may have a silver/blue with light brown while another might have a black and creamy colour.

The long coat on the Yorkshire Terrier means that the breed requires regular brushing.[3]

Hypoallergenic coats

The typical fine, straight, and silky Yorkshire Terrier coat has also been listed by many popular dog information websites as being hypoallergenic. In comparison with many other breeds, Yorkies do not shed to the same degree, only losing small amounts when bathed or brushed.[22] and it is the dog’s dander and saliva that trigger most allergic reactions.[23] Allergists do recognize that at times a particular allergy patient will be able to tolerate a particular dog, but they agree that “the luck of the few with their pets cannot be stretched to fit all allergic people and entire breeds of dogs.”[24] The Yorkshire Terrier coat is said to fall out only when brushed or broken, or just said to not shed.[25]Although neither of those statements agree with what biologists, veterinarians, and allergists know about dog fur, allergists “think there really are differences in protein production between dogs that may help one patient and not another”.[24]

Other colours

The Yorkshire Terrier is a tan dog with a blue saddle. Particolours exist, although they are not correct for the breed standard. The particolour coat is white with black/blue and tan. The white is caused by the recessive Piebald-gene. It is very rare to get a particolour, and if one is found, it tends to be very expensive.[26] Some Yorkshire Terriers are solid golden, they only produce pheomelanin, others are liver or chocolate, a brown colour; they only produce brown eumelanin but are unable to produce black eumelanin.[27] The breed is defined by its colour, and such non-standard colours may indicate health problems or cross-breeding with other breeds of other colours.[21] The AKC registration form for Yorkshire Terriers allows for four choices: blue and tan, blue and gold, black and tan, black and gold. Colour alone will not affect whether or not a dog is a good companion and pet. Even though off-coloured Yorkshire Terriers are advertised at premium prices, being of an unusual or atypical colour is neither new, desirable, nor exotic.[26]

Until recently, mismatched Yorkshire Terriers could be crossed with Biewer Terriers, a new breed originated in Germany from particoloured Yorkshire Terriers.[28] Although the American Kennel Club will not deny registration of a Yorkshire Terrier on colour alone, meaning that particolours are now registerable with the AKC, the Yorkshire Terrier Club of America has a directive that “any solid colour or combination of colours other than black and tan” for adult dogs is a disqualification, and “dogs of solid colour, unusual combination of colours, and particolours should be disqualified.”[29]

Puppy coats

It may take three or more years for the coat to reach its final colour. The final colour is usually a black/grayish colour.[29] P. H. Combs, writing in 1891, complained about show wins awarded to puppies, when the dog’s coat does not fully come in until three or four years old, “and the honor of winning such a prize (for a puppy) can therefore be of but little practical benefit to the owner” since the adult dog’s colour cannot be exactly predicted.[30][31]

Coat care

Owners may trim the fur short for easier care. For shows, the coat is left long, and may be trimmed to floor length to give ease of movement and a neater appearance. Hair on the feet and the tips of ears can also be trimmed.[18][19]The traditional long coat is extremely high maintenance. The coat might get knotted if not brushed daily. To prevent breakage, the coat may be wrapped in rice paper, tissue paper, or plastic, after a light oiling with a coat oil. The oil has to be washed out once a month and the wraps must be fixed periodically during the week to prevent them from sliding down and breaking the hair. Elaborate coat care dates from the earliest days of the breed. In 1878, John Walsh described similar preparations: the coat is “well greased” with coconut oil, the dog is bathed weekly, and the dog’s feet are “carefully kept in stockings.”[32]

Temperament

The ideal Yorkshire Terrier character or “personality” is described with a “carriage very upright” and “conveying an important air.”[19] Though small, the Yorkshire Terrier is active, very overprotective, curious, and fond of attention. Mentally sound and emotionally secure ones should normally not show the soft submissive temperament seen in lap dogs although many exhibit this behaviour due to improper training. Because of this, it is advised that a Yorkie would not be suitable for a home with typical young children. Instead, they make ideal companions for older families with many more reputable breeders routinely only homing to families with children older than about 8 years for the comfort of the dog, but more so for the benefit of the child.

Yorkshire Terriers are an easy dog breed to train. This results from their own nature to work without human assistance. They are naturally smart and quick to learn with many being food and or praise motivated. Because they were developed as a working breed many need a lot of both physical and mental stimulation—with both long walks/runs but also indoor games and training to keep their mind busy. They are known for being yappy, but many have reported that a contented Yorkie is a quiet one—that will happily curl up on your knee in the evening. Of course, it must be noted that they are all individuals, with some being much more laid back than others and the breeder should ideally be able to advise on the needs and temperaments of their particular line. Yorkies are easily adaptable to all surroundings, travel well and make suitable pets for many homes. Due to their small size, they require limited exercise but need daily interaction with people. They thrive on attention and love. Many however are timider around other dogs and prefer to stay close to their humans for comfort.[3]

Yorkshire Terriers do tend to bark a lot. This makes them excellent watchdogs as they will sound the alarm when anyone gets close. However, this barking problem can be resolved with proper training and exercise.

Yorkshire Terriers are ranked 27th in Stanley Coren’s The Intelligence of Dogs.[33]

 

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Yorkshire_Terrier&oldid=783004188

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